How to validating the parser in perl


24-May-2019 01:50

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

This makes possible large-scale changes that wouldn’t be attempted if they’d have to be filtered through the small group of core developers. In this project I am going to create a Markua parser in Perl 5, or at least I start doing it and will implement enough of so I can start writing the Perl Maven articles in Markua.

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2

This makes possible large-scale changes that wouldn’t be attempted if they’d have to be filtered through the small group of core developers.

In this project I am going to create a Markua parser in Perl 5, or at least I start doing it and will implement enough of so I can start writing the Perl Maven articles in Markua.

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000020 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 354 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 005 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

[[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] 0000010 [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems. Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.Many common file types like images, music, timestamps, network packets and auth logs all come in binary flavors.Unfortunately it’s nowhere near as exciting as the fictitious depictions from Hackers.Perl has a rightful reputation as a good language for parsing text and even its name originally stands for "Practical Extraction and Report Language".

||

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible.

(So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor who runs the Perl Maven site helps companies set up test automation, CI/CD Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment and other Dev Ops related systems.

Sometimes you’ll unpack some binary data and get garbage.

This happens when the template passed to $ hexdump -c -n 44 /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York 0000000 T Z i f 2 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000010 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 \0 0000020 \0 \0 \0 354 \0 \0 \0 005 \0 \0 \0 024 This gives you a chance to inspect the data byte by byte and see if it matches your template.

]] [[

Very simple, but works for the first test case: examples/markua-parser/491850e/lib/Markua/tells the dot to match 0 or more so in other words the regex inside the parentheses will match any string of any length, it just has to start with something visible. (So there can't be 2 spaces after the initial .) I am not sure if this is the correct regex for the specification of Markua, for that I'd need to read it more thoroughly, but for now it works for us and it satisfies our test. If the regex matches we create an reference to a hash with the name of the tag Gabor wh